COVID-19 Pandemic Travel Restrictions By State

Last updated on 05/12/2022

Like many elements of travel, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant effect on domestic travel. Constantly changing restrictions and guidelines left many travelers unsure about how to travel between states and what will be required of them upon arrival. While many of the state by state COVID-19 travel restrictions have since been lifted, InsureMyTrip continues to aggregate the most recent data from reliable sources, so travelers can plan their trips accordingly. We strive to maintain the most accurate list with the latest restrictions and guidelines for each state. However, we also encourage travelers to research their destinations at both the state and local levels to ensure they have the latest information.

For travelers specifically concerned with cancellation due to a COVID-19 related reason, Cancel for Any Reason (CFAR) coverage offers travelers the most flexibility. It is the only coverage option available to cover cancellation due to fear of travel. However, this benefit is time-sensitive and has other requirements, so not all travelers are eligible. Find out if your trip is eligible for CFAR coverage, and learn more about the requirements, by following the link below.

Learn More About CFAR Coverage

So, before hitting the road on your next U.S. adventure, check our state travel restrictions guide to ensure you know what to expect.

COVID-19 Pandemic Travel Restrictions by US State

For some states, the restrictions are more complex than simply "do I need to quarantine upon arrival or not?" In some cases, cities or counties have local regulations. In other states, like those home to Native American lands, certain reservation restrictions may apply. As a result, it's important to review all the restrictions and guidelines for every destination you plan to visit.

Data below last updated 5/11/2022

State Further Explanation
Alabama As of May 11, 2022, Alabama has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Alaska As of February 14, 2021, travelers and returning residents are no longer required to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result upon arrival. However, anyone who tests positive is still not allowed to travel. Governor Dunleavy has announced new health advisories and guidelines. As of March 12, 2021, the state's official Safe Travels website reflects the Governor's updated guidelines and states that travelers are "advised" to submit a Travel Declaration and Self-Isolation Plan and arrive with a negative melecular based COVID-19 test. Despite the relaxing of these restrictions, we still recommend abiding by the CDC's guidelines for quarantine and encourage travelers to get tested prior to traveling to Alaska. Beginning June 1, 2021, all travelers arriving at Alaska's participating airports will be able to get a free Covid-19 vaccine if they're not already vaccinated.
Arizona As of May 11, 2022, Arizona has no statewide travel restrictions. Travelers should note that some restrictions may be in place for Native American lands. Local restrictions and mask mandates may also apply.
Arkansas As of May 11, 2022, Arkansas has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
California With one of the nation’s highest vaccination rates and lowest case rates, California is open to welcome visitors. Proof of vaccination or a recent negative test is required to attend large indoor events (over 1,000 people). Operators of large outdoor events (over 10,000 people) are encouraged to enact similar vaccination and testing requirements. Attendees should check guidelines with event operators when buying tickets or making reservations. Some San Francisco Bay area and Los Angeles area counties may have additional regulations and guidelines in place. State public health officials recommend anyone coming into California from another state or country be tested three to five days after arriving. Those testing positive should isolate and follow CDC recommendations.
Colorado As of May 11, 2022, Colorado had no statewide travel restrictions, however, the government still encourages travelers to follow the CDC’s travel recommendations. Non-essential travel is not recommended for people who have not been fully vaccinated or are not up to date. Local restrictions and mask mandates may also apply.
Connecticut As of March 19, 2021, Connecticut no longer requires quarantine or testing in lieu of quarantine. Additionally, the new travel advisory states that travelers are no longer be required to fill out a CT Travel Health Form to travel, and the government will no longer be providing Travel Complaint Forms. Mandated self-quarantine is no longer required in Connecticut, but travelers should continue to follow CDC guidelines on quarantine after traveling and observe any local mask mandates.
Delaware As of May 11, 2022, Delaware has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
District of Columbia Proof of vaccination and masks are generally not required in Washington, DC, but visitors are encouraged to check with individual establishments about COVID-19 protocols. Private institutions and local government officials may ask for proof of a negative test. It is recommended to travel with your vaccination card with you in case documentation is required. Unvaccinated or partially vaccinated travelers must follow COVID-19 testing and quarantining requirements for non-essential travel. General travel requirements for unvaccinated visitors include getting a COVID-19 test 1-3 days before visiting DC, getting a COVID-19 test 3-5 days after returning home from their trip and self-quarantining for 7 days after returning home. You do not need a COVID-19 test if traveling from Maryland and Virginia or in DC in less than 24 hours. Fully Vaccinated Visitors (or visitors who tested positive for COVID-19 in the previous 90 days) may travel to DC from domestic locations without quarantining unless showing symptoms of COVID-19.
Florida As of May 11, 2022, Florida has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Georgia As of May 11, 2022, Georgia has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Hawaii As of March 25, 2022, Hawaii Safe Travels restrictions were lifted. Travelers arriving on March 26 or later will no longer be required to complete a Safe Travels application to enter Hawaii. Additionally, there will be no COVID-related requirements for arriving domestic passengers. Travelers arriving in Hawaii directly from international airports must still comply with U.S. federal requirements. We recommend that you consult with your airline, continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines, and comply with mask mandates.
Idaho As of May 11, 2022, Idaho has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Illinois Illinois has no statewide travel restrictions, however, the Chicago Department of Public Health still classifies areas of high risk as Low Level (green), Medium Level (orange), and High Level (red). If areas are Low Level (green), no additional action must be taken. Continue to follow standard guidance related to travel and vaccination. If the areas are Medium Level (yellow), it is recommended individuals wear a mask in indoor public places. If the areas are High Level (orange), travelers should wear a mask in indoor public places. Those who are age 5 or older who are not up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines are advised to avoid travel to High Level counties. Unvaccinated Chicagoans age 5 or older who travel to High Level counties are advised to follow CDC guidance upon returning to Chicago, which includes staying home and quarantining for 5 days after travel and taking a COVID test 3-5 days after return. If the test result is positive, stay home and follow CDC guidance.
Indiana As of May 11, 2022, Indiana has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Iowa As of May 11, 2022, Iowa has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Kansas As of May 11, 2022, Kansas has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Kentucky On April 2, 2021, Kentucky updated its restrictions and now recognizes and defers to the CDC's updated travel guidance, which states that fully vaccinated travelers do not need to get tested before or after travel unless their destination requires it. Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to self-quarantine. Travel is discouraged until you have been fully vaccinated and two weeks has passed since the administration of the final dose. Kentucky defers to the CDC guidance on travel.
Louisiana As of May 11, 2022, Louisiana has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Maine As of May 1, 2021, travelers from all states are able to travel to Maine without providing a negative COVID-19 test result or quarantining, unless otherwise determined by the Maine CDC. If a state experiences a spike in COVID-19 cases, the Maine CDC will apply testing and quarantine protocols to all travelers from that state. Travelers from those states must sign a Certificate of Compliance, which indicates a negative COVID-19 test result, commitment to quarantine in Maine for 10 days, or that quarantine in Maine was completed. Previously, individuals who had completed a COVID-19 vaccination series and were 14 days beyond the completion of the series were exempt from the testing and 10-day quarantine requirement above, regardless of their state of origin. Additionally, an individual who had a positive COVID-19 molecular or antigen test was exempt from the testing and 10-day quarantine requirement above for 90 days (3 months) after their first positive test, provided they remained asymptomatic. As of July 28, 2021, Maine will follow the U.S. CDC’s updated face-covering guidance that recommends all people, regardless of vaccination status, wear face coverings in indoor, public settings in areas with “substantial” or “high” levels of community transmission.
Maryland Effective March 12, 2021, quarantine requirements and other restrictions on out-of-state travel have been lifted. A Maryland Department of Health (MDH) travel advisory remains in place, and Marylanders are strongly encouraged to get tested for COVID-19 upon their return from out-of-state travel. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Massachusetts In Massachusetts, if you are fully vaccinated, you can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic. Fully vaccinated people can resume activities without wearing a mask or physically distancing, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance. The state still recommends that unvaccinated people do not travel, but there are no longer any formal travel restrictions. Effective April 18, 2022, as a result of a change in federal policy, masks are no longer required on public transportation including on the MBTA (except on The Ride), commuter rail, buses, ferries, and airplanes, or while in rideshares (Uber and Lyft), taxis, and livery vehicles. Face coverings are also no longer required inside or outside of transportation hubs, including train stations, bus stops, and airports. The Department of Public Health advises that individuals should wear a mask or face covering when indoors (and not in your own home) if you have a weakened immune system, or if you are at increased risk for severe disease because of your age or an underlying medical condition, or if someone in your household has a weakened immune system, is at increased risk for severe disease or is unvaccinated.
Michigan As of May 11, 2022, Michigan has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Minnesota As of May 11, 2022, Michigan has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates. As a result of an April 18, 2022, federal court decision, the CDC will no longer enforce its order requiring masks on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations. The Department of Justice plans to appeal the court's decision if the CDC determines that a mask requirement for public transportation remains necessary. In the meantime, the CDC continues to recommend that people wear masks in indoor public transportation settings.
Mississippi As of May 11, 2022, Mississippi has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with any mask mandates.
Missouri As of May 11, 2022, Missouri has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Montana As of May 11, 2022, Montana has no statewide travel restrictions. Travelers should note that some restrictions may be in place for Native American lands. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Nebraska As of May 11, 2022, Nebraska has no statewide travel restrictions but restrictions still apply to international travelers. We recommend that domestic travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Nevada As of May 11, 2022, Nevada has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
New Hampshire Domestic travel within the U.S. outside of New England no longer requires quarantine upon return to New Hampshire, although people are recommended to still follow the CDC's travel guidance, including wearing a well-fitted face mask while traveling, practicing social distancing, getting tested 3-5 days after travel (with a molecular or PCR-based test), and limiting public interactions after travel (even if not required to quarantine).
New Jersey As of May 17, 2021, New Jersey's travel advisory is no longer in effect. The CDC, however, has recommendations for both vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Travelers leaving New Jersey should check with the travel destination and transportation carrier (i.e., airline, cruise ship, etc.) to see if there are additional health and safety protocols or requirements, such as proof of a negative COVID-19 test within days of departure. Travelers should also check with their employers, schools, and other entities that may have quarantine policies for individuals returning from travel. Currently, the CDC recommends delaying travel until you are fully vaccinated. Domestic travelers who are unvaccinated should get tested 1-3 days before their trip, 3-5 days after travel, and stay home and self-quarantine for 7 days after domestic travel. For those traveling to New Jersey, domestic travel is defined as lasting 24 hours or longer to states or U.S. territories other than those connected to New Jersey, such as Pennsylvania, New York, and Delaware.
New Mexico Effective February 11, 2021, New Mexico will no longer require self-quarantine for travelers arriving from "high-risk" states. Instead, visitors from outside of the state are strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 14 days and to get a COVID-19 test upon their arrival in or return to New Mexico. Some travel restrictions in New Mexico are now enforced at the county level, so be sure to check your specific destinations for local restrictions before you go, especially for Native American lands. As of July 1, 2021, capacity restrictions on businesses and mass gatherings in New Mexico are no longer in place. Effective February 17, 2022, New Mexico will no longer require a face mask be worn in all public indoor spaces.
New York As of June 25, New York has removed all travel restrictions. The Traveler Health Form is no longer required. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates. Travelers visiting New York City should note that mask mandates and even proof of vaccination may be required at indoor businesses due to the recent rise in Omicron variant cases.
North Carolina As of May 11, 2022, North Carolina has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
North Dakota As of May 11, 2022, North Dakota has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Ohio Effective March 10, 2021, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) will no longer issue a travel advisory for those entering Ohio after traveling to states reporting positive testing rates of 15% or higher. Instead, ODH is revising its travel guidance to encourage Ohioans to carefully review Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance when considering travel and comply with mask mandates.
Oklahoma As of May 11, 2022, Oklahoma has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with any mask mandates.
Oregon Oregon no has statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with any mask mandates. As of March 11th, masks are no longer be required in indoor spaces including schools. Please continue to be patient, flexible and kind, especially if asked to mask up, or share your vaccination status. These measures are in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Masks are still “strongly recommended” in the outdoors for people at higher risk from the disease, such as people who are elderly, immunocompromised, or those who haven’t been vaccinated.
Pennsylvania As of March 1, 2021 the Order of the Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Health for Mitigation Relating To Travel is no longer in effect. Travelers should still practice appropriate public health measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 such as masking, physical distancing, and hand hygiene. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with any mask mandates.
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico recently updated its guidance. Now, all passengers arriving on domestic flights are required to show a negative COVID-19 test (either antigen or PCR performed by an authorized health provider) result taken within 48 hours before arrival time, regardless of vaccination status. Passengers arriving without a test will have 48 hours to take one upon arrival or be subject to a fine. Unvaccinated travelers must quarantine for 7 days after arriving, regardless of whether they have a negative test result. Negative COVID-19 test results and vaccination cards must be uploaded to the Travel Declaration Form portal, which produces a QR code to proceed. A copy of the vaccination card will not be accepted. As of March 10th, masks are no longer mandatory on the Island with the exception of events hosting over 1,000 people. However, masks are still recommended for situations where vaccination status cannot be guaranteed. Individual establishments reserve the right to implement their own requirements surrounding masks and COVID-19 protocols, and visitors are encouraged to contact businesses directly.
Rhode Island If you're traveling to Rhode Island from a location within the United States (U.S.) or U.S. territories, you’re not currently required to quarantine or get tested after arrival whether or not you're vaccinated. However, the state still recommends that if you’re not yet fully vaccinated, get tested with a viral COVID-19 test 3-5 days after travel within the U.S. and U.S. territories and stay home and quarantine for a full 7 days after travel. Even if your test result is negative, stay home and quarantine for 7 days. If your test result is positive, isolate at home away from others. If you don’t get tested, stay home and quarantine for 10 days after travel. Whether or not you get tested, avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days after travel. You're fully vaccinated if you’ve gotten all recommended doses of a COVID-19 vaccine authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or World Health Organization (WHO) and more than 14 days have passed since the final dose, which now includes booster doses.
South Carolina As of May 11, 2022, South Carolina has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
South Dakota As of May 11, 2022, South Dakota has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates. Special restrictions may apply to Native American lands.
Tennessee As of May 11, 2022, Tennessee has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Texas As of May 11, 2022, Texas has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Utah As of May 11, 2022, Utah has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Vermont Domestic travelers are no longer required to test or quarantine. CDC recommends delaying travel until you are fully vaccinated, because travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Travelers should follow the guidelines of the state or county they visit. These rules may be different state by state or county by county. Keep in mind that mask mandates may vary, so we recommend keeping a face covering with you at all times. Be sure to carry your COVID-19 vaccination card with you in case a business or venue asks for verification.
Virginia As of May 11, 2022, Virginia has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Washington As of March 19, 2021, Gov. Jay Inslee rescinded his November 2020 Travel Advisory and is advising Washingtonians and others visiting Washington to comply with the Center for Disease Control’s current COVID-19 travel advisory guidance. If you must travel, take steps to protect yourself and others: If you are eligible, get fully vaccinated for COVID-19. Before you travel, get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before your trip. Wear a mask over your nose and mouth when in public. Avoid crowds and stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who did not travel with you. Get tested 3-5 days after your trip and stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days after travel, even if your test is negative. If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
West Virginia As of May 11, 2022, West Virginia has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Wisconsin As of May 11, 2022, Wisconsin has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.
Wyoming As of May 11, 2022, Wyoming has no statewide travel restrictions. We recommend that travelers continue to follow the CDC’s travel guidelines and comply with mask mandates.

Traveling Safely During the Pandemic

If you do plan on traveling during the pandemic, be sure to take the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of yourself and others around you. We recommend the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention’s (CDC) comprehensive guide to traveling safely during the pandemic.

COVID-19 Pandemic Travel Packing Checklist

To make sure you are well prepared, we have created a simple packing checklist for your travels:

  • Face Mask
    • Wear this at all times in public spaces
    • If it is a fabric mask, be sure to wash it regularly
  • Hand Sanitizer
    • Apply before and after touching public surfaces or items, as well as before and after eating or drinking
  • Anti-bacterial Wipes
    • Perfect for wiping down door handles, gas pumps, steering wheels, and any other hard surfaces you may touch
  • Contactless Payment Card
    • Cash is a high-touch item often passed between multiple people
  • Non-perishable Food
    • This will minimize food stops and limit exposure to others
    • Non-perishable food also prepares for unexpected restaurant closures
    • Avoid eating and drinking in public as this will require the removal of your mask
  • Prescription Medicine
    • When possible, arrange to pick this up curbside to avoid unnecessary contact
  • Carry-on Luggage
    • If you are flying, opt for carry-on luggage so you can avoid lingering in crowded spaces at baggage claim
    • You also have better control over who touches your luggage
  • Essential Clothing Only
    • Consider packing light to fit your belongings in a carry-on
    • Be sure to wash your clothing regularly, especially once they have been exposed to the public

U.S. State Sources for COVID-19 Travel Restrictions

State Source for Updates
Alabama https://covid19.alabama.gov/
Alaska https://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Epi/id/Pages/COVID-19/default.aspx
Arizona https://www.azdhs.gov/
Arkansas https://healthy.arkansas.gov/
California https://www.cdph.ca.gov/
Colorado https://cdphe.colorado.gov/
Connecticut https://portal.ct.gov/Coronavirus/travel
Delaware https://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/index.html
District of Columbia https://coronavirus.dc.gov/
Florida https://floridahealthcovid19.gov/
Georgia https://dph.georgia.gov/
Hawaii https://health.hawaii.gov/
Idaho https://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/
Illinois https://dph.illinois.gov/
Indiana https://www.in.gov/health/
Iowa https://idph.iowa.gov/
Kansas https://www.coronavirus.kdheks.gov/
Kentucky https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/Pages/default.aspx
Louisiana https://ldh.la.gov/
Maine https://www.maine.gov/covid19/
Maryland https://health.maryland.gov/pages/home.aspx
Massachusetts https://www.mass.gov/covid-19-updates-and-information
Michigan https://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs
Minnesota https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/coronavirus/prevention.html#travel
Mississippi https://msdh.ms.gov/
Missouri https://health.mo.gov/index.php
Montana https://dphhs.mt.gov/
Nebraska https://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/default.aspx
Nevada https://dpbh.nv.gov/
New Hampshire https://www.dhhs.nh.gov/
New Jersey https://covid19.nj.gov/
New Mexico https://www.nmhealth.org/
New York https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/covid-19-travel-advisory
North Carolina https://www.ncdhhs.gov/
North Dakota https://www.health.nd.gov/
Ohio https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/home
Oklahoma https://oklahoma.gov/covid19.html
Oregon https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/pages/index.aspx
Pennsylvania https://www.health.pa.gov/Pages/default.aspx
Rhode Island https://health.ri.gov/
South Carolina https://scdhec.gov/covid19
South Dakota https://doh.sd.gov/
Tennessee https://www.tn.gov/health.html
Texas https://dshs.state.tx.us/
Utah https://coronavirus.utah.gov/
Vermont https://accd.vermont.gov/covid-19/
Virginia https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/
Washington https://doh.wa.gov/
West Virginia https://dhhr.wv.gov/bph/Pages/default.aspx
Wisconsin https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/
Wyoming https://health.wyo.gov/

This guidance of United States Pandemic Travel Restrictions by State is provided for informational and educational purposes only. It is intended to offer travelers guidance regarding domestic travel. The information in this article reflects the most up-to-date information available at the time of publication. Due to the developing situation and lack of uniform reporting methods between states, some information may not be current. Please check the official state website of any state you plan to travel to/through for the most accurate information at the time of travel.